Preview: Moss

Among Skyrim VR, the Until Dawn first-person horror prequel The Inpatient, some racing game, and others, the only PSVR game that was on display that made me turn my head twice starred a tiny mouse that was communicating with the player using sign language. It resembled an art style and aesthetic similar to the comic book Mouse Guard, and featured a cute mouse communicating in a way I hadn’t seen in a game yet. That’s the game I wanted play. That’s what I wanted my first PSVR experience to be. It was called Moss.

Upon placing the VR headset on, I entered a woodland scene. From the leaves, the mouse named Quill entered and looked at me. She gestured below to a body of water in front of her. I looked down to find a Miyazaki-esque glowing blue figure looking back at me. It shifted and moved with my movements.  I then realized that I also had control of Quill. I was able to turn and look at the woods behind me, lean forward close to Quill, and peak around corners to reveal areas I couldn’t see before, but I couldn’t move the body of the spirit thing I inhabited; I could only move Quill.

I moved Quill from the left of the screen towards the right, executing Nathan Drake-style jumps and maneuvers up stones, under fallen branches, and leaping across small gaps to the next screen. Quill was faced with a gap she could not jump. As the spirit-like being I was playing, I was able to move the Dualshock 4 which simulated a floating orb on screen, that I could use to manipulate certain terrain and items that had a soft blue glow. Using the triggers, I grabbed onto a large block that I could slide into the gap Quill could not clear, allowing her to finally progress.

Quill and I went through large metal doors into an elaborate dungeon. Mechanical beetles awaited Quill. Armed with a small wooden sword, Quill was able to fight them off. The beetles could also be grabbed and shifted around using the orb.

From the ground I was able to pull out a collapsed staircase that I could also rotate, making it possible for Quill to progress to a higher platform and deeper into the dungeon. After a more complex puzzle that involved rotating and shifting a structure while simultaneously moving Quill through it, the demo ended.

E317_Moss_GDP_SCREENSHOT_05_ClassicControls.png

The rep told me the game was still in its very early stages of development, but it was clear developer Polyarc had a promising game in its hands. It combined the action platformer with VR puzzle solving seamlessly, and had presented a cute main character with unique characteristics that I felt inclined to help.

I was’t able to see just how Quill’s sign language would play a role in the game, but the act in creating a main character that communicated that way excited me, and left me inspired for what it could possibly do for the ASL community.

I don’t own PSVR, nor do I see the possibility of having one in the near future. But no game on the PSVR showroom floor that day enticed me more to get one than Moss.

Whether or not the VR seemed absolutely crucial to the game, I don’t know. But being able to lean in closer to the levels, and look around certain structures, possibly foreshadowed later puzzles that would make it very hard to accomplish without VR.

Moss is currently in development set to be released this winter.

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