Rime Review [Nintendo Switch]

From a glimpse, RiME hits all the right points in presenting itself confidently among other contemporary artful adventure games. It has a distinctive art style, emotionally pounding soundtrack, and a sad yet touching story about a lost boy — yet none of those things feel completely its own, and through all its emotional elements, it seems to lack what matters most, and that’s heart.

You play as a boy who wakes up on a desolate island. With no explanation or context you’re free to roam around.

As you wander through what appears to be ancient civilization left in ruins, you are subtly guided with aid of a wild fox, but never are limited to explore at your own pace. You’ll encounter puzzles primarily solved using the environment around you by shifting certain items, playing with shadows, and other visual elements. The puzzles are easy, some of which I solved on accident almost immediately before understanding what it was that I had to do in the first place.

With easy puzzles and seemingly safe environment, it was hard to pinpoint the importance of doing anything. From the start we’re faced with a tower in the distance, obviously pointing the direction we should be heading. But why that was a priority for a boy that supposedly washed up on shore, didn’t really seem to make a lot of sense.

The stakes are raised, however, when encountering the game’s most prominent foe — a giant bird creature that tails you from above for more than half of the game. Here the creature takes an important object for progressing forward, but again, what we’re progressing towards still seems to have no relevance.

RiME - Switch Screenshot 04

Thankfully, the story behind the boy is unveiled as the game progresses using its environment, and collectibles hidden throughout the world, giving the player somewhat of an objective to explore in order to understand what’s going on. But unfortunately we’re left only with hints, most of which don’t make sense until the game’s somewhat underwhelming and cliche ending.

Environments do vary from an open peaceful seaside, to underwater ruins, but still maintain a similar gray blocky theme throughout, which becomes dull fairly quick.

To its merits, it is much longer than other games of its genre. However, after my 7-10 hour playthrough, I’d make the argument here that length is only as important as the value gained from the experience, and in this case RiME could have benefited from some heavy trimming.

RiME doesn’t utilize any of Switch’s features such as motion controls or its touch screen while in handheld mode — and that’s okay. It does however suffer from severe framerate drops that occur consistently. Most of which happen randomly with no indication of the game doing anything taxing to the hardware. This is my first rodeo with the game so I can’t compare its performance to its PS4 or XboxOne release. But I’m hard pressed to think it’s due to any limitations of Switch given its current library which seemingly has much more demanding titles. I can only hope that there’s a day one update that addresses its performance.

RiME’s strongest traits come from it’s design, and artistic direction, but fails to implement anything new to the genre. It has a little bit of everything from environmental storytelling, puzzles, and exploration, but it doesn’t do any of things particularly well or original.

What we’re left with in the end is a hollow attempt at trying to be some its better contemporaries. And by never truly fulfilling its own identity, it all comes off trying a bit too hard, making it more self-indulgent than rewarding for the audience.

Given Switch’s currently library, RiME does fill a much needed gap in its genre of art focused exploration puzzle games such as Journey, ABZU, Unfinished Swan, and the like. So those eager for a unique experience, especially on the go, RiME answers some of those prayers. Just be ready for a inconsistent performance, easy puzzles, and lackluster pacing.

Switch owners solution to games like Journey and The Witness, this is not.

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